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Socialism Junked

”The reduced use of cigarettes in theatre performances and films will also help to end the status of smoking as an acceptable, sociable activity.”

Those were the words of a spokesman for the socialist lead Scottish Excecutive, commenting on a particular subset of the 'smoke free' provisions foisted upon an overwhelmed Scottish public (Actors not permited to smoking on stage) in the spring of 2006.

Since the fall of the wall (in 1989) and the subsequent collapse of the Soviet Socialist Empire, socialists and leftists have been scavenging the political scrapyard, to see if there might be something they could use to prop up their socialist coocoons. They have found the carcasses of environmentalism and healthism to fill out their ideological void.

When socialism and marxism were invented in the mid 19'th century, these ideologies were born out of great social evils. Although these ideologies have inspired good reforms and instilled social understanding into classical liberal thinking, they have also induced their own evils, in the form of communism and inspiration to facism.

How are the heirs to this ideology faring today?

Well, in Scotland the socialists are doing the bidding of healthism. With the launching of a great programme to oust smoking, it has created a new underclass - the smokers.

They are the second class citizens, the subhumans. They are to be expoited for taxation profits. All evils are to be blamed upon them. Reverse Robin Hood, in the name of health.

So socialism has, in the course of 150 years, turned from being the liberator of the poor, the meek and the hungry, to shamelessly creating a new proletariate upon the backs of which it rides in order to stay in power.

Full circle, from liberation to tyrranny.


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