Selected Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Grants

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Selected Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Grants - 1992 to 1999

Summary compiled by Wanda Hamilton

 

Second Quarter 1999

 Join Together - $2.4 million renewal award to Boston University School of Public Health.

 Partnership for a Drug-Free America - $15 million renewal award for media campaign.

 University of California at San Diego - $599,681 for survey of adolescent smoking in CA.

 Brandeis University - $123,670 renewal award for “assisting state policymakers in reducing youth access to tobacco”.

 Tobacco Control journal  support - $452,641 renewal award to Health Research, Inc. Buffalo, NY.

 Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care (HMOs) - $1.1 million to four sites.

 First Quarter 1999

Center for the Advancement of Health - $49,942 for “coordination for a youth tobacco cessation partnership.”

Entertainment Industries Council - $738,222 for “encouraging accurate depiction of substance abuse and addiction by the entertainment industry” (includes tobacco use).

Morehouse School of Medicine (Atlanta) - $155,338 for “development and evaluation of educational materials for medical students on smoking cessation counseling”.

Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care (HMOs) - $932,239 - awards to 10 sites.

SmokeLess States: Statewide Tobacco Prevention and Control Initiatives - $968,784 renewal awards to four sites.

Alliance for Health Reform - $476,816 for “issue briefings on health policy for Washington-based policymakers and journalists.”

Northwestern University Medill School of Journalism - $323,592 for “journalists’ briefings on health.

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism - $294,680 for “journalists’ briefings on health.”

1998 Grants

[In all categories: Total grants 944, total contracts 55, total funding $357,966,263]

Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care - $1,789,867 to 12 sites. Ongoing RWJF program to “promote adoption of innovative approaches for helping Americans enrolled in managed care organizations [HMOs] to avoid the harm caused by tobacco.”  Includes $388,117 to the American Assn. of Health Plans Foundation for “National Technical Assistance Office for Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care.”

Advocacy Institute [See also Institute for Public Policy Advocacy} - $969,404 total for 4 projects:

  • Monograph on tobacco control movement leadership in the ‘global settlement’
  • negotiations and its aftermathAnalysis of policy proposals related to tobacco use by children
  • Planning for a tobacco control analysis project
  • Project to develop an advanced leadership training program in tobacco control.

American Council on Science & Health [ACSH - Elizabeth Whelan’s organization] - $204,465 for a “[study of the perspectives of US leaders on tobacco policy”.

American Medical Association - $175,520 for data “collection and analysis on effective smoking cessation interventions for adolescents”.

 University of California, San Francisco - $49,922 for “background papers on the use of nicotine and other smoking cessation medications in pregnant and adolescent smokers”.

Center for the Advancement of Health - $186,802 total for 2 projects: working group on transdisciplinary tobacco prevention research AND “Coordination for youth tobacco cessation partnership.

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University - $13,197,250 (3 years) [Joseph Califano’s organization].

Entertainment Industries Council, Inc. - $788,222 for 2 projects:  NIDA l998 PRISM awards $50,000 and remainder for “Encouraging accurate depiction of substance abuse and addiction by the entertainment industry”.

Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University - $47,913 for “Developing biomarker feedback for smoking cessation programs” (9 months).

National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids - $225,000 for “Policymakers’ conference on international tobacco control” (6 months).

National Foundation for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Inc. (Atlanta) - $471,714 - for “Counter-marketing tobacco use to teens initiative”.

Research Network on the Etiology of Tobacco Dependence - $1,249,314 to University of Kentucky Research Foundation [Richard Clayton’s org] for 1 year. “Program to bring together leading researchers from a variety of perspectives and disciplines to work collaboratively in the study of the etiology of tobacco dependence in an effort to increase understanding of the development of tobacco dependence.”

Smoke-Free Families:  Innovations to Stop Smoking During and Beyond Pregnancy - An ongoing RWJF project - $818,032 for 6 sites, including:  the American Association of Health Plans [HMOs], American Cancer Society (for “dissemination project to address tobacco in pregnancy”), National Conference of State Legislatures (for “survey of state policies on smoking cessation treatment).

SmokeLess States (an ongoing RWJF program) -  $3,890,140 to 11 sites, including $1 million to the Public Health Institute of Berkeley, CA and $868,544 to the AMA for “technical assistance and direction for SmokeLess States.”

Stanford University School of Law - $157,115 for “Preparation and publication of a book on tobacco policies” (14 months).

Substance Abuse Policy (an ongoing project which emerged after tobacco policy grant program ended) - Awards generally ranging from $100,000 to $350,000 for 31 sites, including UCSF, Center for Media Education, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University School of Public Health, Health Research Inc., Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Institute for Health Advocacy, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Hygiene and Public Health, Columbia University’s school of public health, Univ. of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Public Health Institute.  “Research Program to provide support for investigators to conduct policy research on a variety of projects directed at helping the country reduce the harm caused by substance abuse.”  Includes tobacco use.

 1997 Grants & Contracts

[Total for all grants and contracts in all areas - $330,914,852]

Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care [HMOs] - Ongoing RWJF program. $717,755.

American Medical Association - $494,068 for hosting the 11th World Conference on Tobacco and Health (42 months).

Boston University Medical Center - $190,009 “National conference on the creation of statewide tobacco control programs using tobacco tax funds” (18 months).

Center for Media Education, Inc. - $130,520 “Tracking and analyzing online marketing of tobacco and alcohol products”.

Center for Science in the Public Interest - $185,032 “Technical assistance and training to support community alcohol policy development”.

National Conference of State Legislatures - $121,824 “Monitoring state policy changes regarding the medical use of marijuana”.

National Education Association Health Information Network [teachers’ union] - $499,980 “Teacher, youth, and parent tobacco control advocacy program” (2 years).

Population Communication International, Inc. - $50,000 “Conference on health issues for soap opera writers and producers” (3 months).

Research Network on the Etiology of Tobacco Dependence, Univ. of Kentucky Research Foundation  [see l998] - $658,315 (1 year).

The Science and Public Policy Institute - $25,000 “Support for Advisory Committee on Tobacco Policy and Public Health” (1 month).

SmokeFree Educational Services Inc. [Joe Cherner’s org.] = $50,000 Smokefree advertising campaign on NYC taxi cabs  (6 months).

Smoke-Free Families [ongoing RWJF program - see l998] - $1,310,590, including $264,264 to Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta for “development of software to analyze maternal and child health mortality, morbidity, and economic cost attributable to smoking”  (1 year).

SmokeLess States [ongoing RWJF program - see l998] - More than $13 million generally for 3 and 4 year grants (many to ACS) to 19 sites, including $186,608 to American Nonsmokers’ Rights Foundation for “Improving state and local coalitions’ knowledge about tobacco industry strategies” (2 years).  Also $946,732 to AMA for technical assistance and direction for SmokeLess States program (16 months) and $157,855 to Institute for Public Policy Advocacy [AKA: Advocacy Institute], also for “technical assistance.”

Substance Abuse Policy Research Program [ongoing RWJF program - see l998] grants to 27 sites, including $259,723 to Tobacco Control Resource Center, Inc, Richard Daynard for “Effective Responses to the Tobacco Industry’s Legal Challenges to Local Tobacco Control Efforts” [ID# 31610] (2 years).

Surveillance of Youth Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use - Ongoing program for:

·         University of Illinois at Chicago [Frank Chaloupka et al] $13,467,454 (5 years) and $32,546 (1 month).

·         University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor $7 million (5 years).

·         National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. - $253,030 “The impact of environmental factors on youth and young adult tobacco use” (2 years). The NBER also published Chaloupka’s tax and teen smoking “study.” TFK press release on this - 7/18/96.

Tobacco Control Resource Center, Richard Daynard - $198,533 “Assisting state policymakers in reducing youth access to tobacco” (18 months).

Yeshiva University, Albert Einstein College of Medicine - $200,000 for “Preparation of a case study on the FDA’s decision to regulate tobacco (1 year).

 Selected l997 Contracts

Investor Responsibility Research Center - $424,497 for “Tracking the tobacco stock divestment issue (2 years).

New Jersey Nets - $191,500 “‘Smoking is an offensive foul’ NJ Nets anti-tobacco media and education program (1 year).

Prospect Associates - $51,588 - Feasibility of involving Major League Soccer in preventing tobacco use by youth (7 months).

RWJF science conference on the prevention of tobacco use - Judith Schector, $10,804; Schlegel & Assoc $14,704.

SmokeLess States Contracts:

 ·         Mathematica Policy Research, Inc - $1,510,391 for “Surveys of public views on tobacco control issues for SmokeLess States grantees” (3 years).

·         Prospect Associates - $53,200 - l997 national conference of state-level tobacco prevention professionals (4 months).

·         Strategy Communication Action, Ltd. (NY, NY) - $50,000 “communications support for a project to track the portrayal of alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs in entertainment television” (6 months).

 1996 Grants & Contracts

American Lung Association - $200,000 “Education about preemption of local laws and its impact on tobacco regulation” (1 year).

American Medical Association - $29,855 “Planning for the 11th World Conference on Tobacco and Health” (6 months).

Boston University School of Public Health - $50,000 “Development of a National Tobacco Control World Wide Web Site (1 year). This was for the development of QuitNet for Join Together.

Center for the Advancement of Health - $49,699 “Managed care [HMOs] performance indicators for prevention and treatment of tobacco use and addiction” (6 months).

Center for Science in the Public Interest - $78,000 “Development of a community resource guide to address off-campus binge drinking” (1 year).

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc. - $49,981 “Dissemination of the federal AHCPR Guidelines on Smoking Cessation to organized labor” (6 months).

Educational Broadcasting Corporation - $4,380,107 “Production, promotion and outreach for a public television series on addiction and recovery” (19 months).  This highly advertised program, hosted by Bill Moyers, also prominently featured tobacco “addiction” in one of its segments.

Hedrick Smith Productions, Inc. - $150,000 “Outreach for a PBS series using the tobacco lobby as an example of systemic problems facing government” (8 months). 

National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids - “Program to support a national campaign to reduce youth tobacco use through the establishment of a center to develop a national strategy, serve as a media center, provide technical assistance, and broaden organizational support to reduce youth tobacco use”

·         American Cancer Society - $489,890 (4 months)

·         National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids - $19,510,110 (5 years)

National Foundation for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Inc. - $451,185 “Research on racial and gender differences in teen smoking” (1 year)

Partnership for a Drug-Free America, Inc. NY,NY - $10,499,534 “Continuation of a media campaign to reduce demand for illegal drugs” (3 years).

Pinney Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD - $72,000 “Conference on policy issues related to implementation of AHCPR’s smoking clinical practice guidelines of smoking cessation” (9 months)   

Research Network Initiative on the Etiology of Tobacco Dependence, Univ. of Kentucky Research Foundation [see l997 and l998] - $235,374 (1 year) This was the first year for planning and developing this network, which came to fruition in l999 funded by NCI and RWJF in “partnership.”

St. Peter’s Medical Center (RWJ Medical School) - $46,531 “Development of a loaner service for exhibits and related materials about tobacco products and promotions” (1 year) - AND $27,883 “Meeting to explore public health implications of alternative nicotine delivery devices (1 year).

Smoke-Free Families:  Innovations to Stop Smoking During and Beyond Pregnancy [ongoing RWJF program]:

·         University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine - $484,167 “technical assistance and direction” (1 year).

·         Foundation for State Legislatures - $19,137 “Survey of state Medicaid and health insurance policies regarding reimbursement for smoking cessation treatment” (3 months).

·         SmokeLess States (ongoing RWJF program) - Varying awards for varying periods for 12 sites, including $748,595 to AMA for technical assistance and direction; $147,529 to Institute for Public Policy Advocacy also for technical assistance.

1996 Contracts

American Medical Association - $95,300 “Media briefing on the hazards of tobacco use” (1 month), and $70,893 “Primary care practitioners’ pocket guide on AHCPR smoking cessation guideline” (3 months).

Business Communications - $17,000 “Communications support for a conference on AHCPR’s smoking cessation guidelines (4 months) AND $5,000 “Media resource guide on tobacco” (1 month).

Hayes, Domenici & Associates - $65,522 conference on women and smoking (8 months).

New Jersey Nets - $164,000 “National Basketball Association program to educate youth about the health risks of tobacco use” (1 year).

New Sounds Inc. - $27,000 Production and distribution of radio spots on tobacco (3 months).

Pinney Associates [Jack Henningfield of  Johns Hopkins is associated and John Pinney is a consultant to Smith-Klein and is a former head of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health] - $36,750 “Working group on tobacco dependence treatment policy” (5 months) and $35,500 for preparation of proceedings from the conference on AHCPR’s Smoking Cessation Guidelines (1 year).

Pyramid Communications (Seattle, WA) - $197,843 for conference on the Science of Preventing Tobacco Use (10 months).

Roswell Park Cancer Institute [M. Cummings is there] - $23,309 “Technical assistance on RWJF tobacco control policy and program initiatives and evaluations” (1 year).

Strategic Consulting Services - $12,175; facilitator for the RWJF Science Conference on the prevention of tobacco use (8 months).

Tobacco Policy Research and Evaluation Program - “Program to provide support for investigators to conduct policy research on projects aimed at helping public and private policymakers adopt policies to reduce tobacco use in this country, especially among children and youth.”

Miller & Associates, Oakland, CA - $8,000 for “Review of econometric model that estimates the costs of smoking” (1 month).

 1995 Grants

American Cancer Society, Inc. - $499,900 “Public education campaign on the health benefits of tobacco product taxes” (1.5 years).

American Medical Association - $453,154 “Coordinating committee to prevent tobacco use by youth” (6 months).

Audits & Surveys, NY, NY - $673,300 (contract) “National study in support of youth anti-tobacco programs”  (1 year).

Boston University School of Public Health - $5,499,212 for national resource for community substance abuse initiatives (3 years).  Join Together.

Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University - $2,000,000 continued funding for the Center (2 years).

The Cultural Environment Movement, Philadelphia PA - $491,273 for alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drugs in the media mainstream: trends and content (2 years).

Development Communications Associates Inc., Boston MA - $270,000 (contract) for resource development for a national public education effort to reduce tobacco use by youth (1 year). [See also RWJF Grant Results 1995 American Communication Foundation].

Free To Grow: Head Start Partnerships to Promote Substance-Free Communities - This is a continuing RWJF program, but among the entries in l995 are three very odd ones:

·         HMO Group, Inc., New Brunswick NJ - $199,793 for collaborative HMO effort to reduce tobacco use among youth (2 years)

·         Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston MA - $89,798 for technical assistance to college administrators on binge drinking issues (5 months).

·         Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston MA - $50,000 for “Research on the tobacco industry’s 35-year public relations strategy” (1 yr).  A Feb, l998 RWJF “Grant Results Report” reveals that this grant “co-funded the Harvard Book Project on Tobacco and Health” which produced: “SMOKESCREEN: The Truth Behind the Tobacco Industry Cover-up by Philip J. Hilts, a correspondent on health and science policy for The New York Times who was a fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health’s Center for Health Communication.”  It was published in l996 by Addison Wesley.

St. Peter’s Medical Center [RWJ Medical School] New Brunswick, NJ - $398,000 for statewide model on treating tobacco addiction in drug and alcohol treatment settings (2 years).

Smoke-Free Families:  Innovations to Stop Smoking During and Beyond Pregnancy, an ongoing RWJF program.  Awards ranging from $200,000+ to $400,000+ (most for 2 years) for 11 different sites.

SmokeLess States: Statewide Tobacco Prevention and Control Initiatives, an ongoing RWJF program - $4,322,488 to 5 sites.  Primary benefactor is ACS, Arizona Division, which got $3,175,823 (5 years).  Includes $472,070 to AMA for technical assistance for one year and $140,000 to Institute for Public Policy Advocacy [AKA: Advocacy Institute] also for technical assistance for one year. 

Tobacco Control Resource Center, Inc. [Richard Daynard’s organization] - $92,650 for meeting “for state attorneys general and public health commissioners on tobacco control among youth” (6 months).

Tobacco Policy Research and Evaluation Program, ongoing RWJF program, which supports “projects that will produce policy-relevant information about ways to reduce tobacco use in the United States:

·         Montefiore Medical Center - $222,173 (1.5 years) Peter S. Arno.

·         St Peter’s Medical Center [RWJ Medical School] New Brunswick NJ - John Slade, $84,013 (1 yr) for “Analysis of Whether Tobacco Meets the Legal Definition of a Drug”.

·         Stanford University School of Law - $110,714

·         “Eight projects providing a variety of support services for Foundation programs to promote health and prevent disease by reducing harm caused by substance abuse. $372,117 (contracts).”  No further specifications.

 1994 Grants

[Total for all grants in all areas - $180,510,763.  In l994 focus in Substance Abuse area was illicit drugs, with somewhat less focus on alcohol abuse and tobacco use]

Carter Center, Atlanta GA - $91,000 for consensus conference on policy options to prevent tobacco use among children and youth (4 months).

Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., Princeton NJ - $142,600 for a national tobacco survey (16 months).  Note:  Mathematica Policy Research actually got a total of $1.3 million to conduct surveys and “to help the various coalitions [SmokeLess States and anti-tobacco coalitions] disseminate their results.” The RWJF “recognized that a national survey to gauge public acceptance of a variety of policy options, and an accompanying effort to get the results out to government, the media, other researchers, and the general public, could support the policy goals of its SmokeLess States Program.”  And indeed it did.  When the survey was released, there was much media coverage and David Kessler, former head of FDA, said the survey “played a critical role in winning the necessary support for the FDA’s tobacco control policy.”  

Partnership for a Drug-Free America, Inc., ongoing RWJF project - $7,500,000 (3 years).

SmokeLess States - Various awards in this ongoing RWJF program.

Tobacco Policy Research and Evaluation Program, an ongoing RWJF program that supports “projects that will produce policy-relevant information about ways to reduce tobacco use in the United States.”  Among the grantees are:

·         UC at Berkeley, School of Social Welfare - $83,122 (11 months) Leonard S. Miller, “Determining Current Costs of Cigarette Smoking.”

·         UC at San Diego - $94,144 (1 year)

·         Health Research, Inc.; M. Cummings associated with this- $126,593 (2 years). “Environmental and Policy Influences on Tobacco Use”

·         Tobacco Control Resource Center, Inc., Richard Daynard - $113,804 (1.5 years) for “Analysis of the Implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act for Environmental Tobacco Smoke Policy”

·         University of Wisconsin, Madison, Law School - $288,967 (2 years). Marc Galanter, Director, Institute for Legal Studies, for “Assessing the Potential Contribution of Lawsuits in Controlling Tobacco Risks”

·         Stanford University School of Law - $62,974 for technical assistance and direction for the Tobacco Policy Research and Evaluation Program (1year).

·         UC at San Francisco, School of Medicine - $280,517 for “Quality of research on environmental tobacco smoke by different sponsors” (2.5 years).  Lisa Bero of the Institute for Health Policy Studies was the principal investigator and this “study” resulted in a publication in JAMA some years later.

·         North Bay Health Resources Center, Inc.  Rick Kropp, Petaluma CA - $255,940 for study of ways to reduce tobacco sales to minors (2 years).

·         Ron Davis, CHPDP, Henry Ford Center - Public Opinion poll in Michigan.

 1993 Grants

[Total grants for all areas - $135,524,432.  In l993, RWJF authorized $10 million for the SmokeLess States Program, but there were comparatively few grants on the general grant list for l993 which were specifically for tobacco-related topics] 

American Medical Association - $462,432 for technical assistance and direction for SmokeLess States (1 year).

American Medical Association - $19,184 for “support for coordinating committee for a world conference on smoking” (16 months).

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health - $47,331 for “study of the impact of excise taxes on tobacco use (9 months).

Burley Tobacco Growers Cooperative Assoc., Lexington KY - $50,000 for “development of an economic transition plan for tobacco-growing communities” (9 months). [See also Media Guide for K. Warner’s “so-what” “study”].

Harvard University, School of Public Health, Boston MA - $122,287 for “enhancement of the substance abuse component of an antisocial behavior study” (7 months).

Harvard University, School of Public Health - $108,411 for “opportunities for public service campaigns against tobacco and alcohol” (1 year).

Institute for Public Policy Advocacy, Washington DC - $49,997 for “assessing options for learning from tobacco control in other countries” (6 months) Grant I.D.# 22008.  Note: One can only surmise that the “Institute for Public Policy Advocacy” and “The Advocacy Institute” are one and the same because Advocacy Institute’s name  (as well as that of A.I. director Michael Pertschuk) appears on the heading of the Jan l997 grant outcome summary which gives the same grant number and states, “The Program Officer [for RWJF] wrote the Advocacy Institute in May l993 directing them away from exploring international opportunities in tobacco control in general and telling them to focus only on those that specifically had the potential to benefit tobacco control in the United States.  The grant reflected this narrower focus.”  There is also a note in the body of the summary, which states parenthetically: “It should be noted that no official proposal from the Advocacy Institute exists in the Foundation file.”

St. Peter’s Medical Center, RWJ Medical School, New Brunswick NJ - $50,000 for “review of government agencies jurisdiction over tobacco products” (1 year) - John Slade.

Stanford University School of Law - $246,731 for “Technical assistance and direction for the Tobacco Policy Research and Evaluation Program” (1 year). Under this ongoing RWJF program, various universities and other orgs get varying degrees of money for “tobacco policy research and evaluation.”  Not all grantees are always listed. 

George Washington University Medical Center - $268,339 for “evaluation of the SmokeLess States Program - Phase I” (1 year).

American Cancer Society, Atlanta - $400,373 for “public education campaign on the benefits of taxes on tobacco products” (16 months).

American Lung Association of Sacramento - Emigrant Trails - $60,000 for “Conference on state tobacco taxes for key health officials” (16 months).  This was the Seize the Initiative Conference that trained anti-tobacco workers to lobby for tobacco taxes and other anti-tobacco legislation at the state level. RWJF apparently helped with transportation costs for a number of the attendees.  This conference was also partly funded by the Centers for Disease Control.

United Nations Association of the United States of America, Inc, NY, NY - $49,900 for “International conference on global drug policy” (10 months).

 1992 Grants

Total for grants & contracts for all programs: $225.8 million

This was the first year that RWJF moved heavily into substance abuse and especially into tobacco control.  CEO Shroeder’s l992financial report statement emphasized substance abuse and particularly tobacco as a “plague,” a “scourge” and focused a good deal on medical costs.  He announced that in l992 substance abuse had become one of RWJF’s four target areas, and 23% of RWJF funding went toward this goal ($51.4 million).

RWJF total assets in l992:  $3,730,405 [investments in J&J stock value =2,297,316]

RWJF total assets in l991:  $4,081,388 [investments in J&J stock value = $2,604,383]

RWJF grant for STAT [Stop Teenage Addiction to Tobacco] - STAT, a “non-traditional” program was granted $195,332 for 43 months (2/1/92 to 8/31/95).  The Grant Results Report (May l997) states:  “In the early l990s, RWJF added substance abuse--including tobacco--use [sic] to its lists of goal areas.” Shortly thereafter, in July, l991, RWJF approved funding for Stop Teenage Addiction to Tobacco.

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Institute for Social Research, Kenneth Warner - $326,800 (43 mos., 3/1/92 - 9/1/95) for “Worksite Smoking Cessation Programs: Health, Economic and Demographic Implications”

St. Peter’s Medical Center, RWJ Medical School, New Brunswick NJ - $534,663 (3 years) for “Treating tobacco addiction in drug and alcohol treatment settings” a statewide “training program in NJ to help drug and alcohol treatment agencies address the nicotine dependence that frequently accompanies other addictions.”

Consumers Union of United States, Inc., Consumer Reports - $50,000 for “Research to enable revision of a substance abuse source book (15 months).

Institute for Public Policy Advocacy [AKA: Advocacy Institute] - $140,926 for “Development of an effective dissemination strategy for tobacco policy information” (16 months)

University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester MA - $25,000 for “Study of health effects on children from others’ tobacco use (1 year).

University of Michigan, School of Public Health, Ann Arbor - K. Warner. $332,417 for “Research on implications of workplace smoking cessation programs” (2 years). This program funded “Development of a computer simulation model to evaluate the health, economic and demographic effects of workplace smoking cessation programs”.

National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, Washington DC - $350,000 for “Study of nicotine dependence prevention in children and adolescents” (1.5 years).

Stanford University, School of Law - $240,379 for “Technical assistance and direction for the Tobacco Policy Research and Evaluation Program” (1 year).  This seems to be the first year this program was funded.

University of Colorado - $195,333 for “Evaluation of a four-community project to reduce adolescent tobacco use [STAT]” (3 years).

American Lung Association - $145,499 for “Smoking and lung disease prevention curriculum for vocational students” (1 years).

The Carter Center, Emory University - $78,340 for “Development of a Tobacco Tax Policy Task Force” (6 months).

The Scott Newman Center, Los Angeles CA - $250,000 for “Educating youth regarding alcohol and tobacco advertising (15 months).

The Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse [CASA], New York, Joseph Califano’s organization. Initial funding.  - $6 million (3 years)

Partnership for a Drug-Free America, Inc. - $3 million “Media campaign to reduce demand for illegal drugs” (2 years).

National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine - $345,000 for “Technical assistance and direction for the Health Policy Fellowships Program” (1 year) #18555.

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Cambridge MA - $50,000 for “Planning for an initiative to seek more prominence for children’s issues” (1 year).

National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, Washington DC - $365,000 for “Study of the future of dental education in the United States” (2 year).

The American Political Network, Inc. Falls Church VA - $647,008 for “Daily news service on health care issues “ (1 year).

WGBH Educational Foundation, Boston MA - $10,189,229 for “Support for PBS’s ‘The Health Quarterly’ television series” (3 years).


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